Ethan Hoeppner builds off of his definition of “information generalizability” and especially the difference between calculation (the “hard” mathematical solution to finding the best possible move) and analysis (the more intuitive and automatic process of making ambiguious decisions). Interestingly he also draws a connection to the “burden of optimal play”:

The fun strategy and the strategically optimal strategy should be one and the same, but if you give the player infinite time to calculate, they aren’t. You force the player to choose which strategy they will go with: the fun strategy of using analysis, or the boring-but-optimal strategy of using calculation.

Find out more at his blog: https://ethanhoeppner.github.io/gamedesign/turn-based-strategy-games-need-turn-timers.html

On his blog Wonderlust, Elliot George recently wrote about emergence and chaos in games. Continuing his previous explorations of systemic learning, he delved deep into the nature of complex emergent behaviors and their often ambiguous implications in regards to game design:

So there is a kind of tension here, chaos is good for increasing the number of mental models that we use, and therefore offers a lot of opportunities for systemic learning, but it also increases the usefulness of memorisation, which is mostly surface learning.

Check out the full article: https://elliotgeorge.net/2017/02/21/emergence-and-chaos-in-games/

Brett Lowey recently put together a whole collection of posts laying out the game design guidelines behind the BrainGoodGames releases. The ten “design commandments” contain many state-of-the-art design principles of deep and original strategy games.

But beyond “classics” such as elegance, emergence and ambiguity, there is also a strong focus on the experience of playing. Putting fun and constant intellectual enrichment first, as well as treating the player’s time as a valuable good, are core pillars of the described design philosophy.

For all the details, visit: http://blog.braingoodgames.com/2017/02/15/braingoodgames-design-commandments/

“Arcs are one of the fundamental pillars of form, or structure in strategy games, and so they should be considered carefully in any design.”

Keith Burgun explores the topic of “strategy vs. tactics” from a new perspective. The concept of “strategic arcs” serves as a tool to provide strategy games with a more coherent structure. A careful distribution of those arcs can not just help in determining the optimal length of a game, but also in creating “more unique and special” games overall.

Check it out here: http://keithburgun.net/arcs-in-strategy-games/